Impact of night and shift work on metabolic syndrome and its components: a cross-sectional study in an active middle-to-older-aged population-based sample.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_AD4910B295C5
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Impact of night and shift work on metabolic syndrome and its components: a cross-sectional study in an active middle-to-older-aged population-based sample.
Périodique
BMJ open
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Bayon V., Berger M., Solelhac G., Haba-Rubio J., Marques-Vidal P., Strippoli M.P., Preisig M., Leger D., Heinzer R.
ISSN
2044-6055 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2044-6055
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
15/02/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Numéro
2
Pages
e053591
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
To examine the effects of work schedules on metabolic syndrome and its components in active middle-to-older-aged workers.
A cross-sectional analysis including middle-to-older-aged active workers from the population-based CoLaus|PsyCoLaus study (Lausanne, Switzerland) was performed. Work schedule was self-reported and defined as follows: permanent day, day shift, night shift and permanent night work. Associations between work schedule and the risk of metabolic syndrome and its components were analysed using multivariable-adjusted logistic regressions.
A total of 2301 active workers (median age (IQR): 55.4 (50.8 to 60.4), 50.1% women) were included. Of these, 1905 were permanent day workers, 220 were day-shift workers, 134 were night-shift workers and 42 were permanent night-shift workers. There were significant interactions between sex and work schedule for metabolic syndrome, high triglycerides and visceral obesity. Men but not women permanent night workers had a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than permanent day workers in multivariable-adjusted analyses (OR 4.45 (95% CI 1.36 to 14.56)). Analysis of metabolic syndrome subcomponents showed that the association between work schedule and metabolic syndrome in men was mainly driven by visceral obesity (OR 3.35 (95% CI 1.04 to 10.76)). Conversely, women but not men working in night shift were at increased risk of having high triglycerides compared with permanent day workers (OR 2.92 (95% CI 1.03 to 8.27)).
The risk of metabolic syndrome is higher in men working in permanent night shift compared with permanent day work, and this association could be mediated by visceral obesity.
Mots-clé
Aged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology, Metabolic Syndrome/etiology, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Shift Work Schedule/adverse effects, Work Schedule Tolerance, diabetes & endocrinology, epidemiology, general endocrinology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
19/02/2022 11:35
Dernière modification de la notice
01/04/2022 6:35
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