Impact of night and shift work on metabolic syndrome and its components: a cross-sectional study in an active middle-to-older-aged population-based sample.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_AD4910B295C5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Impact of night and shift work on metabolic syndrome and its components: a cross-sectional study in an active middle-to-older-aged population-based sample.
Journal
BMJ open
Author(s)
Bayon V., Berger M., Solelhac G., Haba-Rubio J., Marques-Vidal P., Strippoli M.P., Preisig M., Leger D., Heinzer R.
ISSN
2044-6055 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2044-6055
Publication state
Published
Issued date
15/02/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Number
2
Pages
e053591
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
To examine the effects of work schedules on metabolic syndrome and its components in active middle-to-older-aged workers.
A cross-sectional analysis including middle-to-older-aged active workers from the population-based CoLaus|PsyCoLaus study (Lausanne, Switzerland) was performed. Work schedule was self-reported and defined as follows: permanent day, day shift, night shift and permanent night work. Associations between work schedule and the risk of metabolic syndrome and its components were analysed using multivariable-adjusted logistic regressions.
A total of 2301 active workers (median age (IQR): 55.4 (50.8 to 60.4), 50.1% women) were included. Of these, 1905 were permanent day workers, 220 were day-shift workers, 134 were night-shift workers and 42 were permanent night-shift workers. There were significant interactions between sex and work schedule for metabolic syndrome, high triglycerides and visceral obesity. Men but not women permanent night workers had a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than permanent day workers in multivariable-adjusted analyses (OR 4.45 (95% CI 1.36 to 14.56)). Analysis of metabolic syndrome subcomponents showed that the association between work schedule and metabolic syndrome in men was mainly driven by visceral obesity (OR 3.35 (95% CI 1.04 to 10.76)). Conversely, women but not men working in night shift were at increased risk of having high triglycerides compared with permanent day workers (OR 2.92 (95% CI 1.03 to 8.27)).
The risk of metabolic syndrome is higher in men working in permanent night shift compared with permanent day work, and this association could be mediated by visceral obesity.
Keywords
Aged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology, Metabolic Syndrome/etiology, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Shift Work Schedule/adverse effects, Work Schedule Tolerance, diabetes & endocrinology, epidemiology, general endocrinology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
19/02/2022 11:35
Last modification date
01/04/2022 6:35
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