The cervical spine in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease. A prevalent case-control study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_96C3070A8F95
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
The cervical spine in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease. A prevalent case-control study.
Périodique
Journal of Rheumatology
Auteur(s)
Finckh A., Van Linthoudt D., Duvoisin B., Bovay P., Gerster J.C.
ISSN
0315-162X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2004
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
31
Numéro
3
Pages
545-549
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposition disease is a risk factor for neck pain. METHODS: A prevalent case-control study was conducted to assess cervical calcifications and neck pain between patients with and without known peripheral CPPD deposition disease. CPPD cases were included if diagnosed with CPPD deposition disease of peripheral joints, and excluded if their chief complaint was neck pain. Controls were randomly selected among consecutive patients, hospitalized for conditions unrelated to CPPD deposition disease or neck pain, and matched to CPPD cases by age and sex. Cervical calcifications were assessed by lateral cervical radiographs and computed tomography scans of the upper cervical spine; neck pain and cervical function were appraised by a validated questionnaire. RESULTS: Cervical calcifications were found in 24 out of 35 patients (69%) in the CPPD group compared to 4 out of 35 patients (11%) in the control group (p < 0.001). Patients with CPPD deposition disease reported significantly more neck pain and discomfort than controls (p < 0.001), and were 5 times more likely to report any neck pain (odds ratio 5.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.9, 21.9). Among male patients, more extensive cervical calcified deposits correlated with more severe neck pain (rs = 0.58, p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that CPPD deposition disease frequently involves the cervical spine and may be associated with the development of neck pain.
Mots-clé
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Case-Control Studies, Cervical Vertebrae, Chondrocalcinosis, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Neck Pain, Risk Factors, Single-Blind Method, Switzerland, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
11/04/2008 13:20
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:58
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