Tree species diversity and utilities in a contracting lowland hillside rainforest fragment in Central Vietnam

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 17 ForestFragment_Van & Cochard.pdf (4203.52 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur⸱e
Document(s) secondaire(s)
Télécharger: 17 ForestFragment_Van & Cochard_Additional File 1.pdf (2005.70 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur⸱e
Télécharger: 17 ForestFragment_Van & Cochard_Additional File 2.pdf (1385.42 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur⸱e
ID Serval
serval:BIB_24A7EDE1CC12
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Tree species diversity and utilities in a contracting lowland hillside rainforest fragment in Central Vietnam
Périodique
Forest Ecosystems
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Van Y. T., Cochard R.
ISSN
2197-5620 (Online)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
12/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
4
Numéro
1
Pages
NA
Langue
anglais
Notes
Open Access at: https://forestecosyst.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40663-017-0095-x
Résumé
[Open Access at: https://forestecosyst.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40663-017-0095-x]
Background: Within the highly bio-diverse 'Northern Vietnam Lowland Rain Forests Ecoregion' only small, and mostly highly modified forestlands persist within vast exotic-species plantations. The aim of this study was to elucidate vegetation patterns of a secondary hillside rainforest remnant (elevation 120–330 m, 76 ha) as an outcome of natural processes, and anthropogenic processes linked to changing forest values. Methods: In the rainforest remnant tree species and various bio-physical parameters (relating to soils and terrain) were surveyed on forty 20 m × 20 m sized plots. The forest's vegetation patterns and tree diversity were analysed using dendrograms, canonical correspondence analysis, and other statistical tools. Results: Forest tree species richness was high (172 in the survey, 94 per hectare), including many endemic species (>16%; some recently described). Vegetation patterns and diversity were largely explained by topography, with colline/sub-montane species present mainly along hillside ridges, and lowland/humid-tropical species predominant on lower slopes. Scarcity of high-value timber species reflected past logging, whereas abundance of light-demanding species, and species valued for fruits, provided evidence of human-aided forest restoration and ‘enrichment’ in terms of useful trees. Exhaustion of sought-after forest products, and decreasing appreciation of non-wood products concurred with further encroachment of exotic plantations in between 2010 and 2015. Regeneration of rare tree species was reduced probably due to forest isolation. Conclusions: Despite long-term anthropogenic influences, remnant forests in the lowlands of Vietnam can harbor high plant biodiversity, including many endangered species. Various successive future changes (vanishing species, generalist dominance, and associated forest structural-qualitative changes) are, however, expected to occur in small forest fragments. Lowland forest biodiversity can only be maintained if forest fragments maintain a certain size and/or are connected via corridors to larger forest networks. Preservation of the forests may be fostered using new economic incentive schemes.
Mots-clé
Secondary evergreen monsoon forest, Floristic patterns, Tree species richness, Timber, NTFP, Biodiversity conservation
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
05/02/2018 15:53
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:02
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