Human inhalation exposure to iron oxide particles

Details

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_D91F54A24F3E
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Human inhalation exposure to iron oxide particles
Journal
BioNanoMaterials
Author(s)
Lewinski Nastassja, Graczyk Halshka, Riediker Michael
ISSN-L
2193-066X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
14
Number
1-2
Pages
5-23
Language
english
Notes
Le DOI est erroné sur le site de l'éditeur (De Gruyter)
Abstract
In the past decade, many studies have been conducted to determine the health effects induced by exposure to engineered nanomaterials (NMs). Specifically for exposure via inhalation, numerous in vitro and animal in vivo inhalation toxicity studies on several types of NMs have been published. However, these results are not easily extrapolated to judge the effects of inhaling NMs in humans, and few published studies on the human response to inhalation of NMs exist. Given the emergence of more industries utilizing iron oxide nanoparticles as well as more nanomedicine applications of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), this review presents an overview of the inhalation studies that have been conducted in humans on iron oxides. Both occupational exposure studies on complex iron oxide dusts and fumes, as well as human clinical studies on aerosolized, micron-size iron oxide particles are discussed. Iron oxide particles have not been described to elicit acute inhalation response nor promote lung disease after chronic exposure. The few human clinical studies comparing inhalation of fine and ultrafine metal oxide particles report no acute changes in the health parameters measured. Taken together existing evidence suggests that controlled human exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles, such as SPIONs, could be conducted safely.
Keywords
Nanoparticles , Iron Compounds , Oxidative Stress , Lung , Inhalation Exposure , Occupational Health
Open Access
Yes
Create date
03/10/2013 12:56
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:10
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