Both a single sacral marker and the whole-body center of mass accurately estimate peak vertical ground reaction force in running.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_C4B8719FDC52
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Both a single sacral marker and the whole-body center of mass accurately estimate peak vertical ground reaction force in running.
Journal
Gait & posture
Author(s)
Patoz A., Lussiana T., Breine B., Gindre C., Malatesta D.
ISSN
1879-2219 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0966-6362
Publication state
Published
Issued date
24/07/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
89
Pages
186-192
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
While running, the human body absorbs repetitive shocks with every step. These shocks can be quantified by the peak vertical ground reaction force (F <sub>v,max</sub> ). To measure so, using a force plate is the gold standard method (GSM), but not always at hand. In this case, a motion capture system might be an alternative if it accurately estimates F <sub>v,max</sub> .
The purpose of this study was to estimate F <sub>v,max</sub> based on motion capture data and validate the obtained estimates with force plate-based measures.
One hundred and fifteen runners participated at this study and ran at 9, 11, and 13 km/h. Force data (1000 Hz) and whole-body kinematics (200 Hz) were acquired with an instrumented treadmill and an optoelectronic system, respectively. The vertical ground reaction force was reconstructed from either the whole-body center of mass (COM-M) or sacral marker (SACR-M) accelerations, calculated as the second derivative of their respective positions, and further low-pass filtered using several cutoff frequencies (2-20 Hz) and a fourth-order Butterworth filter.
The most accurate estimations of F <sub>v,max</sub> were obtained using 5 and 4 Hz cutoff frequencies for the filtering of COM and sacral marker accelerations, respectively. GSM, COM-M, and SACR-M were not significantly different at 11 km/h but were at 9 and 13 km/h. The comparison between GSM and COM-M or SACR-M for each speed depicted root mean square error (RMSE) smaller or equal to 0.17BW (≤6.5 %) and no systematic bias at 11 km/h but small systematic biases at 9 and 13 km/h (≤0.09 BW). COM-M gave systematic biases three times smaller than SACR-M and two times smaller RMSE.
The findings of this study support the use of either COM-M or SACR-M using data filtered at 5 and 4 Hz, respectively, to estimate F <sub>v,max</sub> during level treadmill runs at endurance speeds.
Keywords
Biophysics, Rehabilitation, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Biomechanics, Endurance, Gait analysis, Motion capture, Treadmill
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
26/07/2021 8:32
Last modification date
07/08/2021 6:37
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