Venlafaxine versus applied relaxation for generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled study on clinical and electrophysiological outcomes.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_BC755635C7BD
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Venlafaxine versus applied relaxation for generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled study on clinical and electrophysiological outcomes.
Journal
Psychiatric Quarterly
Author(s)
Zullino D., Chatton A., Fresard E., Stankovic M., Bondolfi G., Borgeat F., Khazaal Y.
ISSN
1573-6709 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0033-2720
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Volume
86
Number
1
Pages
69-82
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Some components of generalized anxiety disorder, such as physical symptoms, are thought to reflect autonomic nervous system arousal. This study primarily assessed the relationships between psychophysiological and clinical measures using venlafaxine extended release or applied relaxation, and secondarily, the impact of combination treatment in patients not remitting after 8 weeks. Fifty-eight patients were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of treatment with either venlafaxine or applied relaxation (Phase I). Non-remitted patients received combination treatment for an additional 8 weeks (Phase II). Assessments included the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A), Beck Depression Inventory, Penn State Worry Questionnaire and the Stroop Color-Word Task coupled with electrophysiological measures (skin conductance and frontalis electromyography (EMG)). In Phase 1, a time effect was found for the clinical and skin conductance measures. Thirteen patients from each group were in remission. In Phase 2, seven additional patients remitted. Baseline psychophysiological measures were not associated with baseline clinical variables or with clinical outcomes. Independently of treatment allocation, a reduction in frontal EMG values at week 4 was significantly associated with a decrease in HAM-A scores at week 8. At week 4, responders from the applied relaxation group had lower electrophysiological activity than the venlafaxine group. Baseline psychophysiological measures were not linked with clinical measures at study inclusion or with treatment response. Frontal EMG response at week 4 is a possible predictor of treatment response. Treatment combination enhances treatment response after initial failure.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
18/04/2015 13:30
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:30
Usage data