Conservation tillage and organic farming induce minor variations in Pseudomonas abundance, their antimicrobial function and soil disease resistance.

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_9C15D6ABCD0D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Conservation tillage and organic farming induce minor variations in Pseudomonas abundance, their antimicrobial function and soil disease resistance.
Journal
FEMS microbiology ecology
Author(s)
Dennert F., Imperiali N., Staub C., Schneider J., Laessle T., Zhang T., Wittwer R., van der Heijden MGA, Smits THM, Schlaeppi K., Keel C. (co-last), Maurhofer M.
ISSN
1574-6941 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0168-6496
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/08/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
94
Number
8
Pages
1
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Conservation tillage and organic farming are strategies used worldwide to preserve the stability and fertility of soils. While positive effects on soil structure have been extensively reported, the effects on specific root- and soil-associated microorganisms are less known. The aim of this study was to investigate how conservation tillage and organic farming influence the frequency and activity of plant-beneficial pseudomonads. Amplicon sequencing using the 16S rRNA gene revealed that Pseudomonas is among the most abundant bacterial taxa in the root microbiome of field-grown wheat, independent of agronomical practices. However, pseudomonads carrying genes required for the biosynthesis of specific antimicrobial compounds were enriched in samples from conventionally farmed plots without tillage. In contrast, disease resistance tests indicated that soil from conventional no tillage plots is less resistant to the soilborne pathogen Pythium ultimum compared to soil from organic reduced tillage plots, which exhibited the highest resistance of all compared cropping systems. Reporter strain-based gene expression assays did not reveal any differences in Pseudomonas antimicrobial gene expression between soils from different cropping systems. Our results suggest that plant-beneficial pseudomonads can be favoured by certain soil cropping systems, but soil resistance against plant diseases is likely determined by a multitude of biotic factors in addition to Pseudomonas.
Keywords
Antibiosis/physiology, Antiparasitic Agents/metabolism, Disease Resistance/physiology, Farms, Microbiota, Organic Agriculture/methods, Plant Diseases/parasitology, Plant Diseases/prevention & control, Plant Roots/microbiology, Pseudomonas/genetics, Pseudomonas/isolation & purification, Pseudomonas/metabolism, Pythium/drug effects, RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics, Soil/chemistry, Soil Microbiology, Triticum/microbiology, Triticum/parasitology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
03/05/2018 18:47
Last modification date
13/02/2020 7:19
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