Developmental changes in size effects for simple tie and non-tie addition problems in 6- to 12-year-old children and adults.

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_8D3D166045CE
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Developmental changes in size effects for simple tie and non-tie addition problems in 6- to 12-year-old children and adults.
Journal
Journal of experimental child psychology
Author(s)
Bagnoud J., Dewi J., Castel C., Mathieu R., Thevenot C.
ISSN
1096-0457 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0022-0965
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
201
Pages
104987
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: published
Research data: https://osf.io/etgbs/
Abstract
In the domain of cognitive arithmetic, the size effect corresponds to an increase in solution times as a function of the size of the operands involved in the problems. In this study, we tracked the evolution of size effects associated with tie and non-tie addition problems across development. We scrutinized the progression of solution times for very small problems involving operands from 2 to 4, larger problems, and 1-problems (problems involving 1 as one of the operands) in children from Grade 1 to Grade 5 and adults. For the first time, we document the presence of a size effect for tie problems with a sum up to 8 in Grade 1 children. In contrast, from Grade 3 until adulthood, this size effect could not be evidenced. Crucially, for non-tie problems, whereas a general size effect is observed when contrasting small one-digit additions with large additions, we show that, from Grade 1 until adulthood, a continuous size effect as a function of the sum of the problems is not observed. In fact, for all age groups, medium problems with sums of 8, 9, and 10 do not present a size effect at all. Given that the problem size effect is sometimes referred to as one of the most robust and reliable effects in the numerical cognition literature, our results necessarily challenge its theoretical interpretation.
Keywords
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, Developmental and Educational Psychology, Automatization, Mathematics, Memory retrieval, Mental arithmetic, Operations, Strategies
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation
Create date
11/10/2020 10:57
Last modification date
22/10/2021 6:11
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