Dairy consumption is associated with lower plasma dihydroceramides in women from the D.E.S.I.R. cohort.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_895023AD89B5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Dairy consumption is associated with lower plasma dihydroceramides in women from the D.E.S.I.R. cohort.
Journal
Diabetes & metabolism
Author(s)
Fumeron F., Nicolas A., Bastard J.P., Fellahi S., Wigger L., Ibberson M., Cruciani-Guglielmacci C., Le Stunff H., Velho G., Magnan C., Marre M., Balkau B., Roussel R.
ISSN
1878-1780 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1262-3636
Publication state
Published
Issued date
04/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
46
Number
2
Pages
144-149
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
In the D.E.S.I.R. cohort, higher consumption of dairy products was associated with lower incidence of hyperglycaemia, and dihydroceramide concentrations were higher in those who progressed to diabetes. Our aim here was to study the relationships between dairy consumption and concentrations of dihydroceramides and ceramides.
In the D.E.S.I.R. cohort, men and women aged 30-65 years, volunteers from West-Central France, were included in a 9-year follow-up with examinations every 3 years, including food-frequency questionnaires. Two items concerned dairy products (cheese, other dairy products except cheese). At each examination, dihydroceramides and ceramides were determined by mass spectrometry in a cohort subset; in the present study, the 105 people who did not progress to type 2 diabetes were analyzed, as the disorder per se might be a confounding factor.
Higher consumption of dairy products (except cheese) was associated with total plasma dihydroceramides during the follow-up, but only in women (P=0.01 for gender interaction). In fact, dihydroceramide levels were lower in women with high vs low consumption (P=0.03), and were significantly increased during follow-up (P=0.01) in low consumers only. There was also a trend for lower ceramides in women with high dairy (except cheese) intakes (P=0.08). Cheese was associated with dihydroceramide and ceramide changes during follow-up (P=0.04 for both), but no clear trend was evident in either low or high consumers.
These results show that, in women, there is an inverse association between fresh dairy product consumption and predictive markers (dihydroceramides) of type 2 diabetes.
Keywords
Ceramides, Dairy product intake, Dihydroceramides, General population, Longitudinal study
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/06/2019 17:23
Last modification date
13/06/2020 6:20
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