No renal dysfunction or salt and water retention in acute mountain sickness at 4,559 m among young resting males after passive ascent.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_844E8495F70E
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
No renal dysfunction or salt and water retention in acute mountain sickness at 4,559 m among young resting males after passive ascent.
Journal
Journal of applied physiology
Author(s)
Biollaz J., Buclin T., Hildebrandt W., Décosterd L.A., Nussberger J., Swenson E.R., Bärtsch P.
ISSN
1522-1601 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0161-7567
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/01/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
130
Number
1
Pages
226-236
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
This study examined the role and function of the kidney at high altitude in relation to fluid balance and the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS), avoiding confounders that have contributed to conflicting results in previous studies. We examined 18 healthy male resting volunteers (18-40 yr) not acclimatized to high altitude while on a controlled diet for 24 h at Lausanne (altitude: 560 m) followed by a period of 44 h after reaching the Regina Margherita hut (4,559 m) by helicopter. AMS scores peaked after 20 h at 4,559 m. AMS was defined as functional Lake Louise score ≥ 2. There were no significant differences between 10 subjects with and 8 subjects without AMS for urinary flow, fluid balance, and weight change. Sodium excretion rate was lower in those with AMS after 24 h at altitude. Microalbuminuria increased at altitude but was not different between the groups. Creatinine clearance was not affected by altitude or AMS, whereas clearances of sinistrin and p-aminohippuric acid decreased slightly, somewhat more in those without AMS. Plasma concentrations of epinephrine, norepinephrine, atrial natriuretic factor, and vasopressin increased whereas renin activity, angiotensin, and aldosterone decreased at altitude. Circulating hormone concentrations did not differ between those with and without AMS. Summarizing, in healthy resting young men flown by helicopter to 4,559 m, renal function was not affected by hypoxia except for minor microalbuminuria, high altitude diuresis did not occur, and AMS was not associated with salt and water retention or renal dysfunction.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Kidney function remained essentially unaffected and acute mountain sickness (AMS) was not associated with salt and water retention in healthy young men flown to and resting at the Margherita hut (4,559 m) under strictly controlled conditions maintaining water, salt, and food intake at pre-exposure levels. Thus, renal dysfunction and fluid retention are not essential factors contributing to the pathophysiology of AMS.
Keywords
acute mountain sickness, fluid balance, high altitude, renal function, hypoxia
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
23/11/2020 15:29
Last modification date
14/07/2021 5:39
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