Vitamin D status and functional performance in peripheral artery disease.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_74A3D8EFA63F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Vitamin D status and functional performance in peripheral artery disease.
Journal
Vascular medicine
Author(s)
McDermott M.M., Liu K., Ferrucci L., Tian L., Guralnik J., Kopp P., Tao H., Van Horn L., Liao Y., Green D., Kibbe M., Criqui M.H.
ISSN
1477-0377 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1358-863X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
10/2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
17
Number
5
Pages
294-302
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Multicenter Study ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The clinical implications of low vitamin D in peripheral artery disease (PAD) are unknown. We hypothesized that among individuals with PAD, lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D would be associated with poorer functional performance, more adverse calf muscle characteristics, and poorer peripheral nerve function. Participants were 402 men and women with PAD who underwent measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (DiaSorin radioimmunoassay) along with 6-minute walk testing, measurement of walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, computed tomography-measured calf muscle density, and peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV). Among PAD participants, 20.4% had 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels < 30 nmol/L, consistent with deficient vitamin D status. Adjusting for age, sex, and race, lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were associated with poorer 6-minute walk performance (p trend = 0.002), slower usual-paced 4-meter walking velocity (p trend = 0.031), slower fast-paced 4-meter walking velocity (p trend = 0.043), and lower calf muscle density (p trend = 0.031). After additional adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and diabetes, none of these associations remained statistically significant. However, lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were associated with poorer peroneal NCV (p trend = 0.013) and poorer sural NCV (p trend = 0.039), even after adjusting for age, sex, race, BMI, comorbidities, smoking, physical activity, and other confounders. In conclusion, vitamin D deficiency is common among people with PAD encountered in clinical settings. After adjusting for BMI and diabetes mellitus, we found no significant associations of lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D with poorer functional performance or calf muscle characteristics. Associations of low vitamin D levels with poorer peripheral nerve function require further study.
Keywords
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Ankle Brachial Index, Biomarkers/blood, Chi-Square Distribution, Chicago/epidemiology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Down-Regulation, Exercise Test, Exercise Tolerance, Female, Humans, Intermittent Claudication/blood, Intermittent Claudication/diagnosis, Intermittent Claudication/epidemiology, Intermittent Claudication/physiopathology, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Muscle Contraction, Muscle Strength, Muscle, Skeletal/diagnostic imaging, Muscle, Skeletal/innervation, Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology, Neural Conduction, Peripheral Arterial Disease/blood, Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnosis, Peripheral Arterial Disease/epidemiology, Peripheral Arterial Disease/physiopathology, Peroneal Nerve/physiopathology, Predictive Value of Tests, Prevalence, Radioimmunoassay, Risk Factors, Sural Nerve/physiopathology, Time Factors, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives, Vitamin D/blood, Vitamin D Deficiency/blood, Vitamin D Deficiency/diagnosis, Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology, Vitamin D Deficiency/physiopathology, Walking
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
27/12/2020 23:08
Last modification date
28/12/2020 6:26
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