Attentional Alterations in Alcohol Dependence Are Underpinned by Specific Executive Control Deficits

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_702478D96AD1
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Attentional Alterations in Alcohol Dependence Are Underpinned by Specific Executive Control Deficits
Journal
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Author(s)
Maurage Pierre, de Timary Philippe, Billieux Joël, Collignon Marie, Heeren Alexandre
ISSN
0145-6008
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
38
Number
7
Pages
2105-2112
Language
english
Abstract
Background: Attentional biases and deficits play a central role in the development and maintenance
of alcohol dependence, but the underlying attentional processes accounting for these deficits have been
very little explored. Importantly, the differential alterations across the 3 attentional networks (alerting,
orienting, and executive control) remain unclear in this pathology.
Methods: Thirty recently detoxified alcohol-dependent individuals and 30 paired controls completed
the Attention Network Test, which allow exploring the attentional alterations specifically related
to the 3 attentional networks.
Results: Alcohol-dependent individuals presented globally delayed reaction times compared to controls.
More centrally, they showed a differential deficit across attention networks, with a preserved performance
for alerting and orienting networks but impaired executive control (p < 0.001). This deficit
was not related to psychopathological comorbidities but was positively correlated with the duration of
alcohol-dependence habits, the number of previous detoxification treatments and the mean alcohol
consumption before detoxification.
Conclusions: These results suggest that attentional alterations in alcohol dependence are centrally
due to a specific alteration of executive control. Intervention programs focusing on executive components
of attention should be promoted, and these results support the frontal lobe hypothesis
Keywords
Toxicology, Medicine (miscellaneous), Psychiatry and Mental health, Attention network test, Alcohol use disorder
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
10/01/2020 10:31
Last modification date
18/01/2020 17:46
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