Attentional Alterations in Alcohol Dependence Are Underpinned by Specific Executive Control Deficits

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_702478D96AD1
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Attentional Alterations in Alcohol Dependence Are Underpinned by Specific Executive Control Deficits
Périodique
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Auteur(s)
Maurage Pierre, de Timary Philippe, Billieux Joël, Collignon Marie, Heeren Alexandre
ISSN
0145-6008
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
38
Numéro
7
Pages
2105-2112
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Background: Attentional biases and deficits play a central role in the development and maintenance
of alcohol dependence, but the underlying attentional processes accounting for these deficits have been
very little explored. Importantly, the differential alterations across the 3 attentional networks (alerting,
orienting, and executive control) remain unclear in this pathology.
Methods: Thirty recently detoxified alcohol-dependent individuals and 30 paired controls completed
the Attention Network Test, which allow exploring the attentional alterations specifically related
to the 3 attentional networks.
Results: Alcohol-dependent individuals presented globally delayed reaction times compared to controls.
More centrally, they showed a differential deficit across attention networks, with a preserved performance
for alerting and orienting networks but impaired executive control (p < 0.001). This deficit
was not related to psychopathological comorbidities but was positively correlated with the duration of
alcohol-dependence habits, the number of previous detoxification treatments and the mean alcohol
consumption before detoxification.
Conclusions: These results suggest that attentional alterations in alcohol dependence are centrally
due to a specific alteration of executive control. Intervention programs focusing on executive components
of attention should be promoted, and these results support the frontal lobe hypothesis
Mots-clé
Toxicology, Medicine (miscellaneous), Psychiatry and Mental health, Attention network test, Alcohol use disorder
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
10/01/2020 10:31
Dernière modification de la notice
18/01/2020 17:46
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