Going with the membrane flow: the impact of polarized secretion on bulk plasma membrane flows.

Details

Ressource 1Request a copy Under embargo until 18/11/2022.
UNIL restricted access
State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_6391CD6FACE0
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Going with the membrane flow: the impact of polarized secretion on bulk plasma membrane flows.
Journal
The FEBS journal
Author(s)
Gerganova V., Martin S.G.
ISSN
1742-4658 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1742-464X
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Even the simplest cells show a remarkable degree of intracellular patterning. Like developing multicellular organisms, single cells break symmetry to establish polarity axes, pattern their cortex and interior, and undergo morphogenesis to acquire sometimes complex shapes. Symmetry-breaking and molecular patterns can be established through coupling of negative and positive feedback reactions in biochemical reaction-diffusion systems. Physical forces, perhaps best studied in the contraction of the metazoan acto-myosin cortex, which induces cortical and cytoplasmic flows, also serve to pattern-associated components. A less investigated physical perturbation is the in-plane flow of plasma membrane material caused by membrane trafficking. In this review, we discuss how bulk membrane flows can be generated at sites of active polarized secretion and growth, how they affect the distribution of membrane-associated proteins, and how they may be harnessed for patterning and directional movement in cells across the tree of life.
Keywords
cell polarity, endocytosis, exocytocis, membrane, patterning, secretion, self-organization
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
06/12/2021 8:54
Last modification date
01/03/2022 8:10
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