Sex-allocation conflict and sexual selection throughout the lifespan of eusocial colonies.

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Version: author
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_5EBFE5AA41A4
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Sex-allocation conflict and sexual selection throughout the lifespan of eusocial colonies.
Journal
Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
Author(s)
Avila P., Fromhage L., Lehmann L.
ISSN
1558-5646 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0014-3820
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
73
Number
6
Pages
1116-1132
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Models of sex-allocation conflict are central to evolutionary biology but have mostly assumed static decisions, where resource allocation strategies are constant over colony lifespan. Here, we develop a model to study how the evolution of dynamic resource allocation strategies is affected by the queen-worker conflict in annual eusocial insects. We demonstrate that the time of dispersal of sexuals affects the sex-allocation ratio through sexual selection on males. Furthermore, our model provides three predictions that depart from established results of classic static allocation models. First, we find that the queen wins the sex-allocation conflict, while the workers determine the maximum colony size and colony productivity. Second, male-biased sex allocation and protandry evolve if sexuals disperse directly after eclosion. Third, when workers are more related to new queens, then the proportional investment into queens is expected to be lower, which results from the interacting effect of sexual selection (selecting for protandry) and sex-allocation conflict (selecting for earlier switch to producing sexuals). Overall, we find that colony ontogeny crucially affects the outcome of sex-allocation conflict because of the evolution of distinct colony growth phases, which decouples how queens and workers affect allocation decisions and can result in asymmetric control.
Keywords
Animals, Hymenoptera/growth & development, Hymenoptera/physiology, Longevity, Mating Preference, Animal, Models, Biological, Sex Determination Processes, Conflict, life-history strategy, optimal resource allocation, sex allocation, social insects
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
27/03/2019 21:17
Last modification date
07/07/2020 5:20
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