Predicting spatial patterns of soil bacteria under current and future environmental conditions.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_595C7D7FADB0
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Predicting spatial patterns of soil bacteria under current and future environmental conditions.
Journal
The ISME journal
Author(s)
Mod H.K., Buri A., Yashiro E., Guex N., Malard L., Pinto-Figueroa E., Pagni M., Niculita-Hirzel H., van der Meer J.R., Guisan A.
ISSN
1751-7370 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1751-7362
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Soil bacteria are largely missing from future biodiversity assessments hindering comprehensive forecasts of ecosystem changes. Soil bacterial communities are expected to be more strongly driven by pH and less by other edaphic and climatic factors. Thus, alkalinisation or acidification along with climate change may influence soil bacteria, with subsequent influences for example on nutrient cycling and vegetation. Future forecasts of soil bacteria are therefore needed. We applied species distribution modelling (SDM) to quantify the roles of environmental factors in governing spatial abundance distribution of soil bacterial OTUs and to predict how future changes in these factors may change bacterial communities in a temperate mountain area. Models indicated that factors related to soil (especially pH), climate and/or topography explain and predict part of the abundance distribution of most OTUs. This supports the expectations that microorganisms have specific environmental requirements (i.e., niches/envelopes) and that they should accordingly respond to environmental changes. Our predictions indicate a stronger role of pH over other predictors (e.g. climate) in governing distributions of bacteria, yet the predicted future changes in bacteria communities are smaller than their current variation across space. The extent of bacterial community change predictions varies as a function of elevation, but in general, deviations from neutral soil pH are expected to decrease abundances and diversity of bacteria. Our findings highlight the need to account for edaphic changes, along with climate changes, in future forecasts of soil bacteria.
Keywords
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Microbiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation
Swiss National Science Foundation / 315230-184908
Create date
03/02/2021 15:41
Last modification date
10/04/2021 6:33
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