Regional Delta Waves In Human Rapid Eye Movement Sleep.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_500BD059B81C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Regional Delta Waves In Human Rapid Eye Movement Sleep.
Journal
The Journal of neuroscience
Author(s)
Bernardi G., Betta M., Ricciardi E., Pietrini P., Tononi G., Siclari F.
ISSN
1529-2401 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0270-6474
Publication state
Published
Issued date
03/04/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
39
Number
14
Pages
2686-2697
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Although the EEG slow wave of sleep is typically considered to be a hallmark of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, recent work in mice has shown that slow waves can also occur in REM sleep. Here, we investigated the presence and cortical distribution of negative delta (1-4 Hz) waves in human REM sleep by analyzing high-density EEG sleep recordings obtained in 28 healthy subjects. We identified two clusters of delta waves with distinctive properties: (1) a frontal-central cluster characterized by ∼2.5-3.0 Hz, relatively large, notched delta waves (so-called "sawtooth waves") that tended to occur in bursts, were associated with increased gamma activity and rapid eye movements (EMs), and upon source modeling displayed an occipital-temporal and a frontal-central component and (2) a medial-occipital cluster characterized by more isolated, slower (<2 Hz), and smaller waves that were not associated with rapid EMs, displayed a negative correlation with gamma activity, and were also found in NREM sleep. Therefore, delta waves are an integral part of REM sleep in humans and the two identified subtypes (sawtooth and medial-occipital slow waves) may reflect distinct generation mechanisms and functional roles. Sawtooth waves, which are exclusive to REM sleep, share many characteristics with ponto-geniculo-occipital waves described in animals and may represent the human equivalent or a closely related event, whereas medial-occipital slow waves appear similar to NREM sleep slow waves.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The EEG slow wave is typically considered a hallmark of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, but recent work in mice has shown that it can also occur in REM sleep. By analyzing high-density EEG recordings collected in healthy adult individuals, we show that REM sleep is characterized by prominent delta waves also in humans. In particular, we identified two distinctive clusters of delta waves with different properties: a frontal-central cluster characterized by faster, activating "sawtooth waves" that share many characteristics with ponto-geniculo-occipital waves described in animals and a medial-occipital cluster containing slow waves that are more similar to NREM sleep slow waves. These findings indicate that REM sleep is a spatially and temporally heterogeneous state and may contribute to explaining its known functional and phenomenological properties.
Keywords
Adult, Cerebral Cortex/physiology, Delta Rhythm/physiology, Electroencephalography/methods, Female, Humans, Male, Sleep, REM/physiology, Young Adult, PGO wave, REM sleep, hd-EEG, sawtooth wave, slow wave
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
25/03/2019 11:23
Last modification date
27/04/2020 6:20
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