"I don't know how you are" or indirect questioning in oncology interviews: an ongoing exploratory study

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_44F7EEB16020
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Title
"I don't know how you are" or indirect questioning in oncology interviews: an ongoing exploratory study
Title of the conference
XIV Annual Meeting of the European Association for Consultation Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatics (EACLPP)
Author(s)
Bourquin C., Stiefel F., Berney A., Singy P.
Address
Hungary, Budapest, June 30 th - July 2, 2011
ISBN
0022-3999
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
70
Series
Journal Of Psychosomatic Research
Pages
583-584
Language
english
Notes
Publication type : Meeting Abstract
Abstract
Background: The exploratory study is part of an evaluation of the pre-graduate teaching of communication skills (Lausanne Medical School). It is based on the data of a project highlighting the impact of individualized vs. group training for medicine students in breaking bad news to simulated patients who are diagnosed with cancer. The analysis of the video-taped interviews of the students (N=63) with the RIAS has shown a current usage of utterances such as I don't know if -you have any plans for the future / you have already heard about chemotherapy / ... or I don't know how -you are feeling today after this surgery / you like that all this stuff takes place / ...Aim: The present study questions the specificity of these assertive utterances used as questions (indirect), the specificity of their content, and their intentionality - specific vs. exploratory.Methods: The mentioned utterances are qualitatively analyzed (content analysis, intentionality analysis, etc).Results: 26 students (41%) used 1 to 6 times I don't know utterances during the interviews that contain 53 of such utterances in total. In contrast, they are atypical in an oncologist sample who conducted similar interviews (N=31; 4 oncologist used them 1 to 2 times). In more than half of the cases (29/53), simulated patients interpret I don't know questions as giving them a space to speak (open responses). Conclusions: The atypicality of the I don't know utterances in the oncologist sample may have linguistic explanations in terms of generational marker, but the specificity of the content suggests psychological explanations in terms of defense mechanism as well (marker of "toning down" or insecurity as regards the discussed topic).Keywords: Breaking bad news, communication skills, oncology, pre-graduate medical education, indirect questioning
Keywords
Breaking bad news, communication skills, oncology, pre-graduate medical education, indirect questioning,
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Create date
29/06/2011 14:54
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:49
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