Interplay between insulin signaling, juvenile hormone, and vitellogenin regulates maternal effects on polyphenism in ants.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_3CE1C188A8F9
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Interplay between insulin signaling, juvenile hormone, and vitellogenin regulates maternal effects on polyphenism in ants.
Journal
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Author(s)
Libbrecht R., Corona M., Wende F., Azevedo D.O., Serrão J.E., Keller L.
ISSN
1091-6490 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0027-8424
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
110
Number
27
Pages
11050-11055
Language
english
Abstract
Polyphenism is the phenomenon in which alternative phenotypes are produced by a single genotype in response to environmental cues. An extreme case is found in social insects, in which reproductive queens and sterile workers that greatly differ in morphology and behavior can arise from a single genotype. Experimental evidence for maternal effects on caste determination, the differential larval development toward the queen or worker caste, was recently documented in Pogonomyrmex seed harvester ants, in which only colonies with a hibernated queen produce new queens. However, the proximate mechanisms behind these intergenerational effects have remained elusive. We used a combination of artificial hibernation, hormonal treatments, gene expression analyses, hormone measurements, and vitellogenin quantification to investigate how the combined effect of environmental cues and hormonal signaling affects the process of caste determination in Pogonomyrmex rugosus. The results show that the interplay between insulin signaling, juvenile hormone, and vitellogenin regulates maternal effects on the production of alternative phenotypes and set vitellogenin as a likely key player in the intergenerational transmission of information. This study reveals how hibernation triggers the production of new queens in Pogonomyrmex ant colonies. More generally, it provides important information on maternal effects by showing how environmental cues experienced by one generation can translate into phenotypic variation in the next generation.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
23/07/2013 16:27
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:33
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