The tobacco industry's past role in weight control related to smoking.

Details

Ressource 1Download: BIB_31F077DA0834.P001.pdf (88.52 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_31F077DA0834
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The tobacco industry's past role in weight control related to smoking.
Journal
European Journal of Public Health
Author(s)
Gonseth S., Jacot-Sadowski I., Diethelm P.A., Barras V., Cornuz J.
ISSN
1464-360X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1101-1262
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Volume
22
Number
2
Pages
234-7
Language
english
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Smoking is thought to produce an appetite-suppressing effect by many smokers. Thus, the fear of body weight gain often outweighs the perception of health benefits associated with smoking cessation, particularly in adolescents. We examined whether the tobacco industry played a role in appetite and body weight control related to smoking and smoking cessation.
METHODS: We performed a systematic search within the archives of six major US and UK tobacco companies (American Tobacco, Philip Morris, RJ Reynolds, Lorillard, Brown & Williamson and British American Tobacco) that were Defendants in tobacco litigation settled in 1998. Findings are dated from 1949 to 1999.
RESULTS: The documents revealed the strategies planned and used by the industry to enhance effects of smoking on weight and appetite, mostly by chemical modifications of cigarettes contents. Appetite-suppressant molecules, such as tartaric acid and 2-acetylpyridine were added to some cigarettes.
CONCLUSION: These tobacco companies played an active and not disclaimed role in the anti-appetite effects of smoking, at least in the past, by adding appetite-suppressant molecules into their cigarettes.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
04/09/2011 15:01
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:17
Usage data