Eavesdropping and crosstalk between secreted quorum sensing peptide signals that regulate bacteriocin production in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_2CCE6B25209F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Eavesdropping and crosstalk between secreted quorum sensing peptide signals that regulate bacteriocin production in Streptococcus pneumoniae.
Journal
The ISME journal
Author(s)
Miller E.L., Kjos M., Abrudan M.I., Roberts I.S., Veening J.W., Rozen D.E.
ISSN
1751-7370 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1751-7362
Publication state
Published
Issued date
10/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Number
10
Pages
2363-2375
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Quorum sensing (QS), where bacteria secrete and respond to chemical signals to coordinate population-wide behaviors, has revealed that bacteria are highly social. Here, we investigate how diversity in QS signals and receptors can modify social interactions controlled by the QS system regulating bacteriocin secretion in Streptococcus pneumoniae, encoded by the blp operon (bacteriocin-like peptide). Analysis of 4096 pneumococcal genomes detected nine blp QS signals (BlpC) and five QS receptor groups (BlpH). Imperfect concordance between signals and receptors suggested widespread social interactions between cells, specifically eavesdropping (where cells respond to signals that they do not produce) and crosstalk (where cells produce signals that non-clones detect). This was confirmed in vitro by measuring the response of reporter strains containing six different blp QS receptors to cognate and non-cognate peptides. Assays between pneumococcal colonies grown adjacent to one another provided further evidence that crosstalk and eavesdropping occur at endogenous levels of signal secretion. Finally, simulations of QS strains producing bacteriocins revealed that eavesdropping can be evolutionarily beneficial even when the affinity for non-cognate signals is very weak. Our results highlight that social interactions can mediate intraspecific competition among bacteria and reveal that competitive interactions can be modified by polymorphic QS systems.
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins/genetics, Bacterial Proteins/metabolism, Bacteriocins/genetics, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Operon, Quorum Sensing/physiology, Signal Transduction, Streptococcus pneumoniae/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
23/07/2018 17:56
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:11
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