Will Widespread Synthetic Opioid Consumption Induce Epigenetic Consequences in Future Generations?

Details

Ressource 1Download: PMID30018553.pdf (780.87 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_28E5D540F1EB
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Title
Will Widespread Synthetic Opioid Consumption Induce Epigenetic Consequences in Future Generations?
Journal
Frontiers in pharmacology
Author(s)
Gilardi F., Augsburger M., Thomas A.
ISSN
1663-9812 (Print)
ISSN-L
1663-9812
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Pages
702
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: epublish
PDF: mini review
Abstract
A growing number of evidence demonstrates that ancestral exposure to xenobiotics (pollutants, drugs of abuse, etc.) can perturb the physiology and behavior of descendants. Both maternal and paternal transmission of phenotype across generations has been proved, demonstrating that parental drug history may have significant implications for subsequent generations. In the last years, the burden of novel synthetic opioid (NSO) consumption, due to increased medical prescription of pain medications and to easier accessibility of these substances on illegal market, is raising new questions first in term of public health, but also about the consequences of the parental use of these drugs on future generations. Besides being associated to the neonatal abstinence syndrome, <i>in utero</i> exposure to opioids has an impact on neuronal development with long-term repercussions that are potentially transmitted to subsequent generations. In addition, recent reports suggest that opioid use even before conception influences the reactivity to opioids of the progeny and the following generations, likely through epigenetic mechanisms. This review describes the current knowledge about the transgenerational effects of opioid consumption. We summarize the preclinical and clinical findings showing the implications for the subsequent generations of parental exposure to opioids earlier in life. Limitations of the existing data on NSOs and new perspectives of the research are also discussed, as well as clinical and forensic consequences.
Keywords
epigenetics, opioids, parental exposure, prenatal exposure, transgenerational inheritance, vulnerability
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/07/2018 11:08
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:08
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