Can super smart leaders suffer from too much of a good thing? The curvilinear effect of intelligence on perceived leadership behavior.

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State: Serval
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_1D17920D27A5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Can super smart leaders suffer from too much of a good thing? The curvilinear effect of intelligence on perceived leadership behavior.
Journal
Journal of Applied Psychology
Author(s)
Antonakis J., House R.J., Simonton D.K.
ISSN
1939-1854
0021-9010
Publication state
Published
Issued date
07/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
102
Number
7
Pages
1003-1021
Language
english
Abstract
Although researchers predominately test for linear relationships between variables, at times there may be theoretical and even empirical reasons for expecting nonlinear functions. We examined if the relation between intelligence (IQ) and perceived leadership might be more accurately described by a curvilinear single-peaked function. Following Simonton’s (1985) theory, we tested a specific model, indicating that the optimal IQ for perceived leadership will appear at about 1.2 standard deviations above the mean IQ of the group membership. The sample consisted of mid-level leaders from multinational private-sector companies. We used the leaders’ scores on the Wonderlic Personnel Test—a measure of IQ—to predict how they would be perceived on prototypically effective leadership (i.e., transformational and instrumental leadership). Accounting for the effects of leader personality, gender, age, as well as company, country, and time fixed effects, analyses indicated that perceptions of leadership followed a curvilinear inverted-U function of intelligence. The peak of this function was at an IQ score of about 120, which did not depart significantly from the value predicted by the theory. As the first direct empirical test of a precise curvilinear model of the intelligence-leadership relation, the results have important implications for future research on how leaders are perceived in the workplace.
Keywords
Applied Psychology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
02/03/2017 21:00
Last modification date
08/05/2019 15:22
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