Longitudinal panel data study of self-rated health among migrants in French-speaking Switzerland, 2003–2017

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License: CC BY-NC 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_098A002D413A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Longitudinal panel data study of self-rated health among migrants in French-speaking Switzerland, 2003–2017
Journal
BMJ Open
Author(s)
Mota Pau, Saez Marc, Selby Kevin, Bodenmann Patrick
ISSN
2044-6055
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2020
Volume
10
Number
8
Language
english
Abstract
Introduction Studies have documented poorer health among migrants than natives of several European countries, but little is known for Switzerland. We assessed the association between country of birth, socioeconomic factors and self-reported health (SRH) in a prospective cohort of adults living in Lausanne, Switzerland.Methods We used the data from the Colaus panel data study for three periods: 2003–2006 (n=6733), 2009–2012 (n=5064) and 2014–2017 (n=4555) corresponding to 35% of the source population. The response variable was SRH. Main explanatory variables were socioeconomic status, educational level, professional status, income, gender, age and years in Switzerland. The main covariate was country of birth, dichotomised as born in Switzerland or not. We specified random effects logistic regressions and used Bayesian methods for the inference.Results Being born outside of Switzerland was not associated with worse SRH (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.52 to 2.31). Several other patient variables were, however, predictive of poor health. Educational level was inversely associated with the risk of reporting poor health. Monthly household income showed a gradient where higher income was associated with lower odds of reporting poor SRH, for both for migrants and non-migrants. Migrant women had lower odds of reporting poor SRH than men (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.98). Migrant people living in couple have less risk of reporting poor SRH than people who live alone and the risk is lower for migrant people living in couple with children (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.80).Discussion Migrant status was not associated with poorer SRH. However, differences in SRH were observed based on gender, age and several social determinants of health.
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Create date
18/08/2020 12:16
Last modification date
20/08/2020 5:21
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