Cows and insects helping out to control the weediness of leafy spurge in France

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_F4E27DB4C5D1
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Collection
Publications
Titre
Cows and insects helping out to control the weediness of leafy spurge in France
Titre de la conférence
Proceedings of the XIV Internaional Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds, pp. 159-166
Auteur(s)
Augé M., Le Bourgeois T., Liégeois M., Sforza R.F.H.
Editeur
F.A.C. Impson, C.A. Kleinjan and J.H. Hoffmann (eds). Kruger National Park, South Africa
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Since the 1990s, the negative ecological and economic impacts of the native plant leafy spurge Euphorbia esula L. (Euphorbiaceae), have increased in the floodplains of Val de Saône (France). Growing in dense patches, this latex-rich plant is toxic to cattle and when present in cut hay reduces the profitability of annually mowed grasslands. This economic loss has resulted in land use changes, such as shifting mowed pastures into intensive agricultural (corn) and forestry (poplar) practices. In a prior study, we proposed the implementation of an integrated pest management (IPM) program, based on modification of traditional agricultural practices occurring in the Val de Saône, for controlling weediness of leafy spurge. In this study, we compare the effect of traditional management versus this IPM program on the biology of two principal insect herbivores present in the Val de Saône, Oberea erythrocephala (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and Spurgia euphorbiae (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Traditional mowing takes place between mid-June and early July and appears to have an impact on the biology of the two insects. It occurs during the reproductive period of O. erythrocephala and eliminates the stems that are required for oviposition. Avoiding the mowing of spurge patches, as recommended in the IPM, should enhance O. erythrocephala populations. Mowing also kills shoots that harbor S. euphorbiae galls and so precludes the development of late summer generations of this midge.
Mots-clé
Invasive species, grazing, mowing, natural enemies
Création de la notice
25/06/2019 16:04
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 5:35
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