Hepatitis A in Latin America: a changing epidemiologic pattern

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_EED9F324695B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Hepatitis A in Latin America: a changing epidemiologic pattern
Périodique
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiène
Auteur(s)
Tapia-Conyer  R., Santos  J. I., Cavalcanti  A. M., Urdaneta  E., Rivera  L., Manterola  A., Potin  M., Ruttiman  R., Tanaka Kido  J.
ISSN
0002-9637 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
11/1999
Volume
61
Numéro
5
Pages
825-9
Notes
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Nov
Résumé
In a multicenter study, hepatitis A virus (HAV) seroprevalence was surveyed in six countries in Latin America in which in 12,000 subjects were stratified for age. The highest rates of seroprevalence were recorded in the Dominican Republic (89.0%) and Mexico (81.0%), with lower rates in Brazil (64.7%), Chile (58.1%), Venezuela (55.7%), and Argentina (55.0%). The seroprevalence of HAV in children between 1 and 5 years of age was less than 50%, except in the Dominican Republic. In the 5-10-year-old age group, seroprevalence rates have also decreased compared with previous reports. This suggests that the epidemiology is shifting from high to intermediate endemicity, with the population susceptible to HAV infection shifting from children to adolescents and adults. Furthermore, data from Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico show that HAV seroprevalence is significantly lower in people living in medium and high socioeconomic conditions. This study suggests the need for appropriate vaccination programs to be implemented targeting children, adolescents, and adults, particularly in higher socioeconomic groups.
Mots-clé
Adolescent Adult Age Distribution Child Child, Preschool Cross-Sectional Studies Female Hepatitis A/*epidemiology Hepatitis A Antibodies Hepatitis Antibodies/blood Hepatovirus/*immunology Humans Immunoenzyme Techniques Infant Latin America/epidemiology Male Seroepidemiologic Studies Sex Distribution Social Class
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 21:10
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 22:33
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