Plant invasions into mountains and alpine ecosystems: current status and future challenges.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_C6BCDB6D2DAD
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Plant invasions into mountains and alpine ecosystems: current status and future challenges.
Périodique
Alpine Botany
Auteur(s)
Alexander J.M., Cavieres L.A., Daehler C., Haider S., Kueffer C., Lembrechts J.J., Liu G., McDougall K., Milbau A., Pauchard A., Rew L.J., Seipel T.
ISSN
1664-221X
ISSN-L
1664-2201
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
126
Numéro
2
Pages
89-103
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Recent years have seen a surge of interest in understanding patterns and processes of plant invasions into mountains. Here, we synthesise current knowledge about the spread of non-native plants along elevation gradients, emphasising the current status and impacts that these species have in alpine ecosystems. Globally, invasions along elevation gradients are influenced by propagule availability, environmental constraints on population growth, evolutionary change and biotic interactions. The highest elevations are so far relatively free from non-native plants. Nonetheless, in total nearly 200 non-native plant species have been recorded from alpine environments around the world. However, we identified only three species as specifically cold-adapted, with the overwhelming majority having their centres of distribution under warmer environments, and few have substantial impacts on native communities. A combination of low propagule availability and low invasibility likely explain why alpine environments host few non-native plants relative to lowland ecosystems. However, experiences in some areas demonstrate that alpine ecosystems are not inherently resistant to invasions. Furthermore, they will face increasing pressure from the introduction of pre-adapted species, climate change, and the range expansion of native species, which are already causing concern in some areas. Nonetheless, because they are still relatively free from non-native plants, preventative action could be an effective way to limit future impacts of invasions in alpine environments.
Mots-clé
Climate change, Elevation gradient, Mountain, Non-native plant, Range expansion
Web of science
Création de la notice
01/09/2016 12:43
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 5:16
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