Striatal implants of fetal striatum or gelfoam protect against quinolinic acid lesions of the striatum.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_C6688D5547C0
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Striatal implants of fetal striatum or gelfoam protect against quinolinic acid lesions of the striatum.
Périodique
Brain Research
Auteur(s)
Pearlman S., Levivier M., Gash D.M.
ISSN
0006-8993 (Print)
ISSN-L
0006-8993
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
1993
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
613
Numéro
2
Pages
203-211
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that intrastriatal implants of fetal striatum significantly attenuate excitotoxic damage resulting from a 240 nmol quinolinic acid (QA) challenge delivered 7 days later. In contrast, animals with intrastriatal implants of other tissue types (adipose tissue, peripheral nerve or adrenal medulla) demonstrate a more limited, but consistent trend in protection from QA excitotoxicity. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that partial striatal protection found in animals receiving peripheral tissue grafts is due to the transplantation procedure eliciting a host response which attenuates excitotoxicity. Adult female Long-Evans rats received either cellular (fetal striatum) or acellular (gelfoam) implants followed 1 week later by a unilateral injection of 240 nmol QA into the grafted striatum. Animals were tested for rotational asymmetries before grafting, post-implantation, and after lesioning. Compared to baseline rotational behavior, rats which received implants did not show changes in ipsilateral turning after QA lesions. This protective effect was not limited to rotational behavior since improvements in spontaneous locomotor activity were evident. In addition, the adipsia and aphagia often associated with striatal lesions were ameliorated in both groups of grafted animals. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that endogenous dopaminergic, cholinergic and enkephalinergic systems in the two transplanted groups sustained less excitotoxic damage than in the QA lesioned, non-grafted animals. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a host generated response activated by the implantation procedure provides a protective effect against QA excitotoxicity.
Mots-clé
Animals, Apomorphine/pharmacology, Brain Tissue Transplantation/physiology, Circadian Rhythm, Corpus Striatum/pathology, Corpus Striatum/physiology, Female, Fetal Tissue Transplantation/physiology, Gelatin Sponge, Absorbable, Motor Activity/drug effects, Motor Activity/physiology, Quinolinic Acid/toxicity, Rats, Stereotyped Behavior/drug effects, Stereotyped Behavior/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
20/01/2008 18:35
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 21:17
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