Differences in sampling techniques on total post-mortem tryptase.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_C6149D5226FD
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Differences in sampling techniques on total post-mortem tryptase.
Périodique
International journal of legal medicine
Auteur(s)
Tse R., Garland J., Kesha K., Elstub H., Cala A.D., Ahn Y., Stables S., Palmiere C.
ISSN
1437-1596 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0937-9827
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
132
Numéro
3
Pages
741-745
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The measurement of mast cell tryptase is commonly used to support the diagnosis of anaphylaxis. In the post-mortem setting, the literature recommends sampling from peripheral blood sources (femoral blood) but does not specify the exact sampling technique. Sampling techniques vary between pathologists, and it is unclear whether different sampling techniques have any impact on post-mortem tryptase levels.
The aim of this study is to compare the difference in femoral total post-mortem tryptase levels between two sampling techniques.
A 6-month retrospective study comparing femoral total post-mortem tryptase levels between (1) aspirating femoral vessels with a needle and syringe prior to evisceration and (2) femoral vein cut down during evisceration.
Twenty cases were identified, with three cases excluded from analysis. There was a statistically significant difference (paired t test, p < 0.05) between mean post-mortem tryptase by aspiration (10.87 ug/L) and by cut down (14.15 ug/L). The mean difference between the two methods was 3.28 ug/L (median, 1.4 ug/L; min, - 6.1 ug/L; max, 16.5 ug/L; 95% CI, 0.001-6.564 ug/L).
Femoral total post-mortem tryptase is significantly different, albeit by a small amount, between the two sampling methods. The clinical significance of this finding and what factors may contribute to it are unclear. When requesting post-mortem tryptase, the pathologist should consider documenting the exact blood collection site and method used for collection. In addition, blood samples acquired by different techniques should not be mixed together and should be analyzed separately if possible.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Anaphylaxis/diagnosis, Female, Femoral Artery, Femoral Vein, Forensic Pathology/methods, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Specimen Handling/methods, Tryptases/blood, Young Adult, Anaphylaxis, Post-mortem, Sampling, Tryptase
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
22/11/2017 15:11
Dernière modification de la notice
13/11/2018 7:26
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