A DNA barcode reference library for Swiss butterflies and forester moths as a tool for species identification, systematics and conservation.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: journal.pone.0208639.pdf (6734.95 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_BFECD1C3241A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
A DNA barcode reference library for Swiss butterflies and forester moths as a tool for species identification, systematics and conservation.
Périodique
PloS one
Auteur(s)
Litman J., Chittaro Y., Birrer S., Praz C., Wermeille E., Fluri M., Stalling T., Schmid S., Wyler S., Gonseth Y.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
13
Numéro
12
Pages
e0208639
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Butterfly monitoring and Red List programs in Switzerland rely on a combination of observations and collection records to document changes in species distributions through time. While most butterflies can be identified using morphology, some taxa remain challenging, making it difficult to accurately map their distributions and develop appropriate conservation measures. In this paper, we explore the use of the DNA barcode (a fragment of the mitochondrial gene COI) as a tool for the identification of Swiss butterflies and forester moths (Rhopalocera and Zygaenidae). We present a national DNA barcode reference library including 868 sequences representing 217 out of 224 resident species, or 96.9% of Swiss fauna. DNA barcodes were diagnostic for nearly 90% of Swiss species. The remaining 10% represent cases of para- and polyphyly likely involving introgression or incomplete lineage sorting among closely related taxa. We demonstrate that integrative taxonomic methods incorporating a combination of morphological and genetic techniques result in a rate of species identification of over 96% in females and over 98% in males, higher than either morphology or DNA barcodes alone. We explore the use of the DNA barcode for exploring boundaries among taxa, understanding the geographical distribution of cryptic diversity and evaluating the status of purportedly endemic taxa. Finally, we discuss how DNA barcodes may be used to improve field practices and ultimately enhance conservation strategies.
Mots-clé
Animals, Butterflies/classification, Butterflies/genetics, DNA/chemistry, DNA/isolation & purification, DNA/metabolism, DNA Barcoding, Taxonomic, Electron Transport Complex IV/classification, Electron Transport Complex IV/genetics, Female, Gene Library, Insect Proteins/classification, Insect Proteins/genetics, Male, Moths/classification, Moths/genetics, Switzerland
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
09/01/2019 1:50
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 16:34
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