Neurobiological measures of human selective attention.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_B451B8BE8A9F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Neurobiological measures of human selective attention.
Périodique
Neuropsychologia
Auteur(s)
Driver J., Frackowiak R.S.
ISSN
0028-3932 (Print)
ISSN-L
0028-3932
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2001
Volume
39
Numéro
12
Pages
1257-1262
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; ReviewPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Selective attention allows people to process some stimuli more thoroughly than others. This is partly under voluntary control, and partly determined by stimulus salience. Selective attention has been studied with psychological methods for many years, but recent cognitive neuroscience studies using brain-imaging methods (and other neurobiological measures) have transformed the topic. Such studies have demonstrated that sensory processing can be strongly modulated by attention throughout perceptual networks, including even processing in primary sensory cortex. They have shown that some of these modulations can be anticipatory, arising prior to stimulus presentation, while other components reflect a changed neural response to an incoming stimulus. Recent imaging studies have also examined the mechanisms involved in controlling such attentional modulation of sensory processing. In addition to answering many long-standing questions about selective attention, such research also raises new questions. The various contributions in this volume provide an overview of the spectacular recent advances in attention research using neurobiological measures, and they outline critical issues to be resolved in the future.
Mots-clé
Attention/physiology, Brain/anatomy & histology, Brain/metabolism, Cognition/physiology, Evoked Potentials/physiology, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetoencephalography/methods, Perception/physiology, Tomography, Emission-Computed
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
12/09/2011 20:08
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 20:41
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