Exudative mineral losses after serious burns: a clue to the alterations of magnesium and phosphate metabolism.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_A1B4FC08DC23
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Exudative mineral losses after serious burns: a clue to the alterations of magnesium and phosphate metabolism.
Périodique
The American journal of clinical nutrition
Auteur(s)
Berger M.M., Rothen C., Cavadini C., Chiolero R.L.
ISSN
0002-9165
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
1997
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
65
Numéro
5
Pages
1473-81
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't - Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Hypomagnesemia and hypophosphatemia are frequent after severe burns; however, increased urinary excretion does not sufficiently explain the magnitude of the mineral depletion. We measured the mineral content of cutaneous exudates during the first week after injury. Sixteen patients aged 34 +/- 9 y (mean +/- SD) with thermal burns were studied prospectively and divided in 3 groups according to the extent of their burn injury and the presence or absence of mineral supplements: group 1 (n = 5), burns covering 26 +/- 5% of body surface; group 2 (n = 6), burns covering 41 +/- 10%; and group 3 (n = 5), burns covering 42 +/- 6% with prescription of magnesium and phosphate supplements. Cutaneous exudates were extracted from the textiles (surgical drapes, dressings, sheets, etc) surrounding the patients from day 1 to day 7 after injury. Mean magnesium serum concentrations decreased below reference ranges in 12 patients between days 1 and 4 and normalized thereafter. Phosphate, normal on day 0, was low during the first week. Albumin concentrations, normal on day 0, decreased and remained low. Urinary magnesium and phosphate excretion were within reference ranges and not larger in group 3. Mean daily cutaneous losses were 16 mmol Mg/d and 11 mmol P/d (largest in group 2). Exudative magnesium losses were correlated with burn severity (r = 0.709, P = 0.003). Cutaneous magnesium losses were nearly four times larger than urinary losses whereas cutaneous phosphate losses were smaller than urinary phosphate losses. Mean daily losses of both magnesium and phosphate were more than the recommended dietary allowances. Exudative losses combined with urinary losses largely explained the increased mineral requirements after burn injury.
Mots-clé
Adult, Burns, Exudates and Transudates, Humans, Kinetics, Magnesium, Magnesium Deficiency, Nitrogen, Phosphates, Potassium, Prospective Studies, Serum Albumin, Skin
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 17:52
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 20:08
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