Vaccinia immune globulin: current policies, preparedness, and product safety and efficacy.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_9C0E2FAB742D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Vaccinia immune globulin: current policies, preparedness, and product safety and efficacy.
Périodique
International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Auteur(s)
Wittek R.
ISSN
1201-9712 (Print)
ISSN-L
1201-9712
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/2006
Volume
10
Numéro
3
Pages
193-201
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
In 1980 the World Health Organization declared that smallpox was eradicated from the world, and routine smallpox vaccination was discontinued. Nevertheless, samples of the smallpox virus (variola virus) were retained for research purposes, not least because of fears that terrorist groups or rogue states might also have kept samples in order to develop a bioweapon. Variola virus represents an effective bioweapon because it is associated with high morbidity and mortality and is highly contagious. Since September 11, 2001, countries around the world have begun to develop policies and preparedness programs to deal with a bioterror attack, including stockpiling of smallpox vaccine. Smallpox vaccine itself may be associated with a number of serious adverse events, which can often be managed with vaccinia immune globulin (VIG). VIG may also be needed as prophylaxis in patients for whom pre-exposure smallpox vaccine is contraindicated (such as those with eczema or pregnant women), although it is currently not licensed in these cases. Two intravenous formulations of VIG (VIGIV Cangene and VIGIV Dynport) have been licensed by the FDA for the management of patients with progressive vaccinia, eczema vaccinatum, severe generalized vaccinia, and extensive body surface involvement or periocular implantation following inadvertent inoculation.
Mots-clé
Bioterrorism, Humans, Immunization Programs/organization & administration, Immunization Programs/standards, Immunization, Passive/methods, Immunization, Passive/standards, Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/pharmacokinetics, Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use, Program Development, Smallpox Vaccine/adverse effects, Vaccinia/prevention & control, Vaccinia/therapy, Vaccinia virus/immunology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 10:43
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:02
Données d'usage