Age effects on the neural correlates of successful memory encoding.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_926804E86718
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Age effects on the neural correlates of successful memory encoding.
Périodique
Brain
Auteur(s)
Morcom A.M., Good C.D., Frackowiak R.S., Rugg M.D.
ISSN
0006-8950 (Print)
ISSN-L
0006-8950
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2003
Volume
126
Numéro
Pt 1
Pages
213-229
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Event-related functional MRI (fMRI) was used to investigate the neural correlates of memory encoding as a function of age. While fMRI data were obtained, 14 younger (mean age 21 years) and 14 older subjects (mean age 68 years) made animacy decisions about words. Recognition memory for these words was tested at two delays such that older subjects' performance at the short delay was comparable to that of the young subjects at the long delay. This allowed age-associated changes in the neural correlates of encoding to be dissociated from the correlates of differential recognition performance. Activity in left inferior prefrontal cortex and the left hippocampal formation was greater for subsequently recognized words in both age groups, consistent with the findings of previous studies in young adults. In the prefrontal cortex, these 'subsequent memory effects' were, however, left-lateralized in the younger group but bilateral in the older subjects. In addition, for the younger group only, greater activity for remembered words was observed in anterior inferior temporal cortex, as were reversed effects ('subsequent forgetting' effects) in anterior prefrontal regions. The data indicate that older subjects engage much of the same neural circuitry as younger subjects when encoding new memories. However, the findings also point to age-related differences in both prefrontal and temporal activity during successful episodic encoding.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aging/physiology, Brain/physiology, Hippocampus/physiology, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Memory/physiology, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Prefrontal Cortex/physiology, Recognition (Psychology)/physiology, Temporal Lobe/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
12/09/2011 18:24
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 22:06
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