Patterns of split sex ratio in ants have multiple evolutionary causes based on different within-colony conflicts.

Détails

Ressource 1Demande d'une copieEtat: Supprimée
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_8B45F0D615AD
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Patterns of split sex ratio in ants have multiple evolutionary causes based on different within-colony conflicts.
Périodique
Biology letters
Auteur(s)
Kümmerli R., Keller L.
ISSN
1744-957X[electronic]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
5
Numéro
5
Pages
713-6
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Split sex ratio-a pattern where colonies within a population specialize in either male or queen production-is a widespread phenomenon in ants and other social Hymenoptera. It has often been attributed to variation in colony kin structure, which affects the degree of queen-worker conflict over optimal sex allocation. However, recent findings suggest that split sex ratio is a more diverse phenomenon, which can evolve for multiple reasons. Here, we provide an overview of the main conditions favouring split sex ratio. We show that each split sex-ratio type arises due to a different combination of factors determining colony kin structure, queen or worker control over sex ratio and the type of conflict between colony members.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/04/2009 11:36
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:11
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