Microvascular burden and Alzheimer-type lesions across the age spectrum.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_8B03916406CC
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Microvascular burden and Alzheimer-type lesions across the age spectrum.
Périodique
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : Jad
Auteur(s)
Costanza A., Xekardaki A., Kövari E., Gold G., Bouras C., Giannakopoulos P.
ISSN
1875-8908 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1387-2877
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
32
Numéro
3
Pages
643-652
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The occurrence of microvascular and small macrovascular lesions and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathology in the aging human brain is a well-described phenomenon. Although there is a wide consensus about the relationship between macroscopic vascular lesions and incident dementia, the cognitive consequences of the progressive accumulation of these small vascular lesions in the human brain are still a matter of debate. Among the vast group of small vessel-related forms of ischemic brain injuries, the present review discusses the cognitive impact of cortical microinfarcts, subcortical gray matter and deep white matter lacunes, periventricular and diffuse white matter demyelinations, and focal or diffuse gliosis in old age. A special focus will be on the sub-types of microvascular lesions not detected by currently available neuroimaging studies in routine clinical settings. After providing a critical overview of in vivo data on white matter demyelinations and lacunes, we summarize the clinicopathological studies performed by our center in large cohorts of individuals with microvascular lesions and concomitant AD-related pathology across two age ranges (the younger old, 65-85 years old, versus the oldest old, nonagenarians and centenarians). In conjunction with other autopsy datasets, these observations fully support the idea that cortical microinfarcts are the only consistent determinant of cognitive decline across the entire spectrum from pure vascular cases to cases with combined vascular and AD lesion burden.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
01/11/2012 15:36
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 19:11
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