Dancing bees improve colony foraging success as long-term benefits outweigh short-term costs.

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Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_8A5A7EC881C1.P001.pdf (471.33 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_8A5A7EC881C1
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Dancing bees improve colony foraging success as long-term benefits outweigh short-term costs.
Périodique
PLoS One
Auteur(s)
Schürch R., Grüter C.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Numéro
8
Pages
e104660
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Waggle dancing bees provide nestmates with spatial information about high quality resources. Surprisingly, attempts to quantify the benefits of this encoded spatial information have failed to find positive effects on colony foraging success under many ecological circumstances. Experimental designs have often involved measuring the foraging success of colonies that were repeatedly switched between oriented dances versus disoriented dances (i.e. communicating vectors versus not communicating vectors). However, if recruited bees continue to visit profitable food sources for more than one day, this procedure would lead to confounded results because of the long-term effects of successful recruitment events. Using agent-based simulations, we found that spatial information was beneficial in almost all ecological situations. Contrary to common belief, the benefits of recruitment increased with environmental stability because benefits can accumulate over time to outweigh the short-term costs of recruitment. Furthermore, we found that in simulations mimicking previous experiments, the benefits of communication were considerably underestimated (at low food density) or not detected at all (at medium and high densities). Our results suggest that the benefits of waggle dance communication are currently underestimated and that different experimental designs, which account for potential long-term benefits, are needed to measure empirically how spatial information affects colony foraging success.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
17/07/2014 11:03
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:49
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