Thyroid hormone reduces the loss of axotomized sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve transection in adult rat.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_852043892C55
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Thyroid hormone reduces the loss of axotomized sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve transection in adult rat.
Périodique
Experimental neurology
Auteur(s)
Schenker M., Kraftsik R., Glauser L., Kuntzer T., Bogousslavsky J., Barakat-Walter I.
ISSN
0014-4886
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2003
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
184
Numéro
1
Pages
225-36
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't - Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
We have shown that a local administration of thyroid hormones (T3) at the level of transected rat sciatic nerve induced a significant increase in the number of regenerated axons. To address the question of whether local administration of T3 rescues the axotomized sensory neurons from death, in the present study we estimated the total number of surviving neurons per dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in three experimental group animals. Forty-five days following rat sciatic nerve transection, the lumbar (L4 and L5) DRG were removed from PBS-control, T3-treated as well as from unoperated rats, and serial sections (1 microm) were cut. The physical dissector method was used to estimate the total number of sensory neurons in the DRGs. Our results revealed that in PBS-control rats transection of sciatic nerve leads to a significant (P < 0.001) decrease in the mean number of sensory neurons (8743.8 +/- 748.6) compared with the number of neurons in nontransected ganglion (mean 13,293.7 +/- 1368.4). However, administration of T3 immediately after sciatic nerve transection rescues a great number of axotomized neurons so that their mean neuron number (12,045.8 +/- 929.8) is not significantly different from the mean number of neurons in the nontransected ganglion. In addition, the volume of ganglia showed a similar tendency. These results suggest that T3 rescues a high number of axotomized sensory neurons from death and allows these cells to grow new axons. We believe that the relative preservation of neurons is important in considering future therapeutic approaches of human peripheral nerve lesion and sensory neuropathy.
Mots-clé
Animals, Axotomy, Buffers, Cell Count, Cell Death, Cell Size, Female, Ganglia, Spinal, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Male, Nerve Regeneration, Neurons, Afferent, Phosphates, Rats, Rats, Wistar, Sciatic Nerve, Thyroid Hormones, Triiodothyronine
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 13:44
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:56
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