Female barn owls (Tyto alba) advertise good genes.

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Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_822B295FBE8B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Female barn owls (Tyto alba) advertise good genes.
Périodique
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B Biological Sciences
Auteur(s)
Roulin A., Jungi T.W., Pfister H., Dijkstra C.
ISSN
0962-8452
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2000
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
267
Numéro
1446
Pages
937-941
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The good genes hypothesis of sexual selection postulates that ornamentation signals superior genetic quality to potential mates. Support for this hypothesis comes from studies on male ornamentation only, while it remains to be shown that female ornamentation may signal genetic quality as well. Female barn owls (Tyto alba) display more black spots on their plumage than males. The expression of this plumage trait has a genetic basis and it has been suggested that males prefer to mate with females displaying more black spots. Given the role of parasites in the evolution of sexually selected traits and of the immune system in parasite resistance, we hypothesize that the extent of female plumage 'spottiness' reflects immunological defence. We assessed the genetic variation in specific antibody production against a non-pathogenic antigen among cross-fostered nestlings and studied its covariation with the plumage spottiness of genetic parents. The magnitude of the antibody response was positively correlated with the plumage spottiness of the genetic mother but not of the genetic father. Our study thereby provides the first experimental support, to our knowledge, for the hypothesis that female ornamentation signals genetic quality.
Mots-clé
Animals, Antibody Formation/genetics, Erythrocytes/immunology, Female, Genetic Variation, Host-Parasite Interactions/genetics, Male, Models, Genetic, Pigmentation, Selection (Genetics), Sex Characteristics, Sexual Behavior, Animal, Sheep, Strigiformes/genetics, Strigiformes/immunology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 18:43
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:49
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