Colonic movements in healthy subjects as monitored by a Magnet Tracking System.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_7B7BF2842C71
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Colonic movements in healthy subjects as monitored by a Magnet Tracking System.
Périodique
Neurogastroenterology and Motility
Auteur(s)
Hiroz P., Schlageter V., Givel J.C., Kucera P.
ISSN
1365-2982[electronic]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Volume
21
Numéro
8
Pages
838-e57
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The Magnet Tracking System (MTS) is a minimally-invasive technique of continuous evaluation of gastrointestinal motility. In this study, MTS was used to analyse colonic propulsive dynamics and compare the transit of a magnetic pill with that of standard radio-opaque markers. MTS monitors the progress in real time of a magnetic pill through the gut. Ten men and 10 women with regular daily bowel movements swallowed this pill and 10 radio-opaque markers at 8 pm. Five hours of recordings were conducted during 2 following mornings. Origin, direction, amplitude and velocity of movements were analysed relative to space-time plots of the pill trajectory. Abdominal radiographs were taken to compare the progress of both pill and markers. The magnetic pill lay idle for 90% of its sojourn in the colon; its total retrograde displacement accounted for only 20% of its overall movement. Analysis of these movements showed a bimodal distribution of velocities: around 1.5 and 50 cm min(-1), the latter being responsible for 2/3 of distance traversed. There were more movements overall and more mass movements in males. Net hourly forward progress was greater in the left than right colon, and greater in males. The position of the magnetic pill correlated well with the advancement of markers. MTS showed patterns and propulsion dynamics of colonic segments with as yet unmet precision. Detailed analysis of slow and fast patterns of colonic progress makes it possible to specify the motility of colonic segments, and any variability in gender. Such analysis opens up promising avenues in studies of motility disorders.
Mots-clé
Adult, Colon/anatomy & histology, Colon/physiology, Contrast Media/metabolism, Female, Gastrointestinal Motility/physiology, Gastrointestinal Transit/physiology, Humans, Magnetics/instrumentation, Magnetics/methods, Male, Miniaturization, Time Factors, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
11/12/2009 11:02
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 20:49
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