Correlated genetic effects on reproduction define a domestication syndrome in a forest tree.

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Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_79B5CE1ABB91
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Correlated genetic effects on reproduction define a domestication syndrome in a forest tree.
Périodique
Evolutionary Applications
Auteur(s)
Santos-Del-Blanco L., Alía R., González-Martínez S.C., Sampedro L., Lario F., Climent J.
ISSN
1752-4571 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1752-4571
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Volume
8
Numéro
4
Pages
403-410
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Compared to natural selection, domestication implies a dramatic change in traits linked to fitness. A number of traits conferring fitness in the wild might be detrimental under domestication, and domesticated species typically differ from their ancestors in a set of traits known as the domestication syndrome. Specifically, trade-offs between growth and reproduction are well established across the tree of life. According to allocation theory, selection for growth rate is expected to indirectly alter life-history reproductive traits, diverting resources from reproduction to growth. Here we tested this hypothesis by examining the genetic change and correlated responses of reproductive traits as a result of selection for timber yield in the tree Pinus pinaster. Phenotypic selection was carried out in a natural population, and progenies from selected trees were compared with those of control trees in a common garden experiment. According to expectations, we detected a genetic change in important life-history traits due to selection. Specifically, threshold sizes for reproduction were much higher and reproductive investment relative to size significantly lower in the selected progenies just after a single artificial selection event. Our study helps to define the domestication syndrome in exploited forest trees and shows that changes affecting developmental pathways are relevant in domestication processes of long-lived plants.
Mots-clé
adaptation, artificial selection, domestication syndrome, fitness traits, genetic change
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
18/05/2015 9:50
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 20:43
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