Microfabrics in carbonate mylonites along a large-scale shear zone (Helvetic Alps)

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_7723940116B6
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Microfabrics in carbonate mylonites along a large-scale shear zone (Helvetic Alps)
Périodique
Tectonophysics
Auteur(s)
Ebert A., Herwegh M., Evans B., Pfiffner A., Austin N., Vennemann T.W.
ISSN-L
0040-1951
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
444
Pages
1-26
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Carbonate mylonites with varying proportions of second-phase minerals
were collected at positions of increasing metamorphic grade along the
basal thrust of the Morcles nappe (Helvetic nappes, Switzerland).
Variations of temperature, stress, and strain rate, changes in chemistry
of solid and fluid phases, and differing degrees of strain localization
and annealing were tracked by measuring the shapes, mean sizes, and size
distributions of both matrix and second-phase grains, as well as crystal
preferred orientation (CPO) of the matrix. Field structures suggest that
strain rate was constant along the fault. The mean and distribution of
the calcite grain sizes were affected most profoundly by temperature:
Increased temperature, presumably accompanied by decreased stress,
correlated with larger mean sizes and wider size distributions. At a
given location, the matrix grains in mylonites with more second-phase
particles are, on average, smaller, have narrower size distributions,
and have more elongate shapes. For example, mylonites with 50 vol.% of
second phases have matrix grain sizes half that of pure mylonites.
Changes in calcite chemistry and the presence of synkinematic fluids
seemed to influence microfabric only weakly. Temporal variations in
conditions, such as exhumation-induced cooling, apparently provoke
changes in temperature, stress, and strain rate along the nappe. These
changes result in further strain localization during retrograde
conditions and cause the grain size to be reduced by an additional 50%.
The matrix CPO strengthens with increasing temperature or strain, but
weakens and rotates with increasing second-phase content, These fabric
changes suggest differing rates of grain growth, grain size reduction,
and development of CPO owing to variations in the deformation conditions
and, perhaps, mechanisms. To interpret natural mylonite structures or to
extrapolate mechanical data to natural situations requires careful
characterization of the microfabric, and, in particular, second-phase
minerals. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V, All rights reserved.
Création de la notice
29/09/2012 16:23
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:34
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