Microorganisms resistant to free-living amoebae

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_73AE72617B64
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Microorganisms resistant to free-living amoebae
Périodique
Clinical Microbiology Reviews
Auteur(s)
Greub  G., Raoult  D.
ISSN
0893-8512 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
04/2004
Volume
17
Numéro
2
Pages
413-33
Notes
Journal Article
Review --- Old month value: Apr
Résumé
Free-living amoebae feed on bacteria, fungi, and algae. However, some microorganisms have evolved to become resistant to these protists. These amoeba-resistant microorganisms include established pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Legionella spp., Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycobacterium avium, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Francisella tularensis, and emerging pathogens, such as Bosea spp., Simkania negevensis, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, and Legionella-like amoebal pathogens. Some of these amoeba-resistant bacteria (ARB) are lytic for their amoebal host, while others are considered endosymbionts, since a stable host-parasite ratio is maintained. Free-living amoebae represent an important reservoir of ARB and may, while encysted, protect the internalized bacteria from chlorine and other biocides. Free-living amoebae may act as a Trojan horse, bringing hidden ARB within the human "Troy," and may produce vesicles filled with ARB, increasing their transmission potential. Free-living amoebae may also play a role in the selection of virulence traits and in adaptation to survival in macrophages. Thus, intra-amoebal growth was found to enhance virulence, and similar mechanisms seem to be implicated in the survival of ARB in response to both amoebae and macrophages. Moreover, free-living amoebae represent a useful tool for the culture of some intracellular bacteria and new bacterial species that might be potential emerging pathogens.
Mots-clé
Amoeba/growth & development/*microbiology/virology Animals Bacteria/*classification/*growth & development Coculture Techniques
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 15:28
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:20
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