How to describe species richness patterns for bryophyte conservation?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_67A956E9804B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
How to describe species richness patterns for bryophyte conservation?
Périodique
Ecology and Evolution
Auteur(s)
Hespanhol H., Cezon K., Felicisimo A.M., Munoz J., Mateo R.G.
ISSN
2045-7758
ISSN-L
2045-7758
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Volume
5
Numéro
23
Pages
5443-5455
Langue
anglais
Résumé
A large amount of data for inconspicuous taxa is stored in natural history collections; however, this information is often neglected for biodiversity patterns studies. Here, we evaluate the performance of direct interpolation of museum collections data, equivalent to the traditional approach used in bryophyte conservation planning, and stacked species distribution models (S-SDMs) to produce reliable reconstructions of species richness patterns, given that differences between these methods have been insufficiently evaluated for inconspicuous taxa. Our objective was to contrast if species distribution models produce better inferences of diversity richness than simply selecting areas with the higher species numbers. As model species, we selected Iberian species of the genus Grimmia (Bryophyta), and we used four well-collected areas to compare and validate the following models: 1) four Maxent richness models, each generated without the data from one of the four areas, and a reference model created using all of the data and 2) four richness models obtained through direct spatial interpolation, each generated without the data from one area, and a reference model created with all of the data. The correlations between the partial and reference Maxent models were higher in all cases (0.45 to 0.99), whereas the correlations between the spatial interpolation models were negative and weak (-0.3 to -0.06). Our results demonstrate for the first time that S-SDMs offer a useful tool for identifying detailed richness patterns for inconspicuous taxa such as bryophytes and improving incomplete distributions by assessing the potential richness of under-surveyed areas, filling major gaps in the available data. In addition, the proposed strategy would enhance the value of the vast number of specimens housed in biological collections.
Mots-clé
Biodiversity conservation, biological collections, bryophytes, richness models, species distribution models
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
21/01/2016 11:46
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:23
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