Impact of a computerized information system on quality of nutritional support in the ICU

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_47227DB7A394
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Impact of a computerized information system on quality of nutritional support in the ICU
Périodique
Nutrition
Auteur(s)
Berger  M. M., Revelly  J. P., Wasserfallen  J. B., Schmid  A., Bouvry  S., Cayeux  M. C., Musset  M., Maravic  P., Chiolero  R. L.
ISSN
0899-9007 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2006
Volume
22
Numéro
3
Pages
221-9
Notes
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Mar
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: In intensive care units (ICUs), patient outcome depends on quality of nutritional support. We investigated the effect of computerized information systems (CISs) on quality of nutritional support by comparing two ICUs with or without CIS and burned patients before and after CIS implementation. METHODS: Part 1 was a 2-wk prospective survey in two units of a surgical ICU: unit A (11 beds) without CIS and unit B (four beds) with CIS. Part 2 consisted of two 18-mo periods in burn patients before and after CIS implementation. Nurses and doctors belonged to the same team; procedures were identical. A computer page was configured to retrieve data related to nutritional support. RESULTS: A total of 1313 ICU days were analyzed in 109 patients. Patients' characteristics were similar in parts 1 and 2. In part 1, nutritional support was required 38% of days. Nutritional route was similar but data were more frequently missing in unit A. Energy delivery was higher with CIS but below target values in both units (31+/-11% of target in unit A, 77+/-4% in unit B). Computations were incomplete and time consuming for unit A versus B (11+/-2 versus 2+/-1 min/patient, P<0.0001). In part 2, in the 54 burn patients, use of postpyloric feeding tubes and energy delivery increased with CIS, resulting in less weight loss. CONCLUSION: Computerized information systems favored standardization of nutritional care and monitoring, thus decreasing time required for writing and computations. Follow-up was improved and nutrient delivery was closer to target values, thus increasing quality of care. In burn patients, the better data visibility was associated with a significant improvement in nutrient delivery.
Mots-clé
Burns/*therapy Critical Illness/therapy Energy Intake Enteral Nutrition/*standards Female *Hospital Information Systems Humans Intensive Care/standards *Intensive Care Units/standards Male Middle Aged Nutritional Requirements Prospective Studies *Quality of Health Care Treatment Outcome
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 15:12
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 16:49
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