Morphologic-anthropological investigations in tomb K93.12 at Dra' Abu el-Naga (Western Thebes, Egypt).

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_45F4E7AC8073
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Morphologic-anthropological investigations in tomb K93.12 at Dra' Abu el-Naga (Western Thebes, Egypt).
Périodique
Anthropologischer Anzeiger; Bericht uber die biologisch-anthropologische Literatur
Auteur(s)
Lösch S., Moghaddam N., Paladin A., Rummel U., Hower-Tilmann E., Zink A.
ISSN
0003-5548 (Print)
ISSN-L
0003-5548
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
71
Numéro
1-2
Pages
105-122
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Historical Article ; Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
In this study we present the analysis of the human remains from tomb K93.12 in the Ancient Egyptian necropolis of Dra' Abu el-Naga, located opposite the modern city of Luxor in Upper Egypt on the western bank of the Nile. Archaeological findings indicate that the rock tomb was originally built in the early 18th dynasty. Remains of two tomb-temples of the 20th dynasty and the looted burial of the High Priest of Amun Amenhotep have been identified. After the New Kingdom the tomb was reused as a burial place until the 26th dynasty. The skeletal and mummified material of the different tomb areas underwent a detailed anthropological and paleopathological analysis. The human remains were mostly damaged and scattered due to extensive grave robberies. In total, 79 individuals could be partly reconstructed and investigated. The age and sex distribution revealed a male predominance and a high percentage of young children (< 6 years) and adults in the range of 20 to 40 years. The paleopathological analysis showed a high prevalence of stress markers such as cribra orbitalia in the younger individuals, and other pathological conditions such as dental diseases, degenerative diseases and a possible case of ankylosing spondylitis. Additionally, 13 mummies of an intrusive waste pit could be attributed to three different groups belonging to earlier time periods based on their style of mummification and materials used. The study revealed important information on the age and sex distribution and diseases of the individuals buried in tomb K93.12.

Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Bone and Bones/pathology, Burial/history, Child, Child, Preschool, Egypt, Female, History, Ancient, Humans, Hyperostosis/pathology, Infant, Male, Middle Aged, Mummies/history, Mummies/pathology, Orbit/pathology, Paleopathology, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
31/10/2017 11:53
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 16:46
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