Die Rolle des Gemeinen Stars (Sturnus vulgaris) in der Epidemiologie bakterieller, potentiell humanpathogener Krankheitserreger. [The role of common starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in the epidemiology of bacterial, potentially human pathogenic, disease agents]

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_45F34FE5EF46
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Die Rolle des Gemeinen Stars (Sturnus vulgaris) in der Epidemiologie bakterieller, potentiell humanpathogener Krankheitserreger. [The role of common starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in the epidemiology of bacterial, potentially human pathogenic, disease agents]
Périodique
Schweizer Archiv fuer Tierheilkunde
Auteur(s)
Gautsch  S., Odermatt  P., Burnens  A. P., Bille  J., Ewald  R.
ISSN
0036-7281
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
04/2000
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
142
Numéro
4
Pages
165-72
Notes
English Abstract
Journal Article --- Old month value: Apr
Résumé
Since a long time a public garden in Basel is known as a site for overnight accommodation and assembly of starlings. The birds cause an immense faecal contamination of the park and the neighbouring district. A nursery and a primary school are directly affected. To evaluate the health risk coming from the starlings droppings for the population, particularly for the children and to assess the role of starlings in the transmission of diseases to humans and in the epidemiology of human diseases the presence of human bacterial pathogens in the faeces of starlings was determined. Some of the isolated strains were further typed and compared to strains of human origin. C. jejuni, L. monocytogenes and C. psittaci were most often found. The typing of some C. jejuni and L. monocytogenes isolates showed a great variety of geno-, sero- respectively phage types that did not belong to the strains most often found in isolates of human origin. Starlings can harbour human pathogens and therefore a potential risk of infection comes from their droppings. It seems however rather improbable, that these birds present a constant direct source of infection for human beings.
Mots-clé
Animals Bacterial Infections/*transmission Bird Diseases/*transmission *Disease Vectors Feces/*microbiology Humans *Songbirds
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
11/02/2008 13:39
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 16:46
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