Between Idealism and Pragmatism: Social Policies and Matthew Effect in Vocational Education and Training for Disadvantaged Youth in Switzerland

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_18950D697470
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Between Idealism and Pragmatism: Social Policies and Matthew Effect in Vocational Education and Training for Disadvantaged Youth in Switzerland
Périodique
Social Inclusion
Auteur(s)
Pisoni Delia
ISSN
2183-2803
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Volume
6
Numéro
3
Pages
289
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Since the mid-1970s, research shows that less-disadvantaged individuals more frequently access social policy schemes when compared to their more-disadvantaged counterparts, a phenomenon called the Matthew effect. Through two indepth case studies, based on 60 semi-directive interviews, and document analysis, this study aims to more fully understand the mechanisms leading to a Matthew effect in Swiss Vocational Education and Training (VET) programmes for disadvantaged youth. Indeed, education is key to post-industrial labour markets access, and VET appears to facilitate schoolto-work transitions. A Matthew effect in this policy field might thus lead to particularly detrimental repercussions, and public authorities should be especially eager to contain it. Nevertheless, findings show that, under certain conditions, decision-makers push frontline-workers into cream-skimming practices, causing a Matthew effect. Additionally, structural challenges also lead to a Matthew effect, highlighting the general difficulty of the very mandate: (re-)inserting highly disadvantaged individuals into selective markets. Indeed, in contexts of tight public budgets, service oriented modern Welfare States tread a fine line between empowering and prioritising beneficiaries. Dealing with complex target groups, it seems crucial whether the rationale driving public authorities is more oriented towards credit-claiming or problem-solving: the former increasing and the latter decreasing the incidence of Matthew effects.
Mots-clé
disadvantaged youth, education, Matthew effect, social policy, Switzerland, Vocational Education and Training, welfare
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
02/10/2018 15:09
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 5:16
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