When birds of a feather flock together and when they do not: Status composition, social dominance orientation, and organizational attractiveness

Détails

Ressource 1Demande d'une copieEtat: Supprimée
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_05F145F269F3
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
When birds of a feather flock together and when they do not: Status composition, social dominance orientation, and organizational attractiveness
Périodique
Journal of Applied Psychology
Auteur(s)
Umphress E. E., Smith-Crowe K., Brief A. P., Dietz J., Watkins M. B.
ISSN
0021-9010
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
92
Numéro
2
Pages
396-409
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Although similarity-attraction notions suggest that similarity-for example, in terms of values, personality, and demography-attracts, the authors found that sometimes demographic similarity attracts and sometimes it repels. Consistent with social dominance theory (J. Sidanius & F. Pratto, 1999), they demonstrated in 3 studies that when prospective employees supported group-based social hierarchies (i.e., were high in social dominance orientation), those in high-status groups were attracted to demographic similarity within an organization, whereas those in low-status groups were repelled by it. An important theoretical implication of the findings is that social dominance theory and traditional similarity-attraction notions together help explain a more complex relationship between demographic similarity and attraction than was previously acknowledged in the organizational literature.
Mots-clé
Similarity-attraction, Social dominance orientation, Workforce diversity, Recruitment, Organizational attractiveness
Web of science
Création de la notice
05/05/2009 11:42
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 13:25
Données d'usage